Agoraphobia

Agoraphobia in Conjunction With Addiction

Anxiety disorders like agoraphobia often co-occur with substance abuse and treatment at New Method Wellness provides a secure, tranquil environment from which patients and clinicians can work toward the goal of getting free from fear and returning to a functional lifestyle.

About Agoraphobia

Although agoraphobia may sometimes occur without panic disorder, it is typically triggered by the onset of panic attacks associated with panic disorder and approximately one third of individuals who have panic disorder will develop agoraphobia.

Often thought of as a phobia of leaving the home, this common belief is not quite accurate; Agoraphobia could more accurately be described as a phobia of being in a situation where escape would be difficult or impossible if a panic attack were to occur. The phobia is progressive and could lead to a fear of leaving the house, however, it is the panic attack itself in conjunction with being in public that is the cause of the fear.

As with panic disorder, the cause of agoraphobia is not known, though, there are many theories that suggest that the condition is based on a complex interaction of biological, genetic, environmental and social factors.

The symptoms of agoraphobia can be extremely frightening and typically include feelings of panic, avoidant behavior such as limiting activities in order to avoid certain places or situation and clustering, a pattern of avoided situations that is generally present. For example clusters could include public transportation, shopping malls, driving or leaving home.

Treatment of agoraphobia in conjunction with addiction at New Method Wellness entails a comprehensive, holistic approach and, as with all dual diagnostic conditions, each patient will work closely with their clinician and staff psychiatrist to outline the best treatment plan for them as an individual. As always, the best therapeutic approach will be taken to suit the patient’s lifestyle and health considerations, severity of the disorder and other co-occurring conditions.